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Below are our latest posts regarding the coronavirus pandemic.

Latest COVID-19 Relief Package Brings New Employment Law Changes for Businesses

On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed the $1.9 trillion dollar American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 into law (the Act). The latest COVID-19 relief package aims to provide continuing aid to individuals and businesses as the country continues to grapple with the economic fallout created by COVID-19. The new legislation continues some programs (with modifications) from previous stimulus packages, while also creating new programs that affect employers.

Schools Soon Eligible For Tax Credits For Voluntary COVID-19 Paid Leave

On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) into law. This law funds a variety of programs. One such program provides tax credits to employers that voluntarily provide certain types of paid leave to employees. The big change for school districts is that beginning April 1, 2021, for the first time, districts will be eligible for tax credits to cover some of the costs of this leave.

Employer COVID-19 Immunity Included in Unemployment Bill

Governor Evers signed a new bill into law on Thursday, February 25th dealing primarily with updating Wisconsin’s outdated Unemployment Compensation System (2021 Wisconsin Act 4). While this is good news as it should address delays and other processing issues which became evident over the past year, it will take some time for a new system to be designed and implemented.

DOL Issues New Tip Regulations, but Rule’s Future Remains Uncertain

On December 22, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued a final rule revising the FLSA’s tip regulations. In theory, the new rule will go into effect on March 01, 2021. However, it is anticipated that either the Democratic-controlled Congress or incoming Biden administration may eliminate or make substantial revisions to the rule before it can take effect. Employers are encouraged to consult with legal counsel prior to making changes to their tip pooling practices.

Latest Stimulus Bill Does Not Extend The FFCRA Leave Mandate

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (Act) was signed into law by President Trump on Sunday, December 27, 2020. While the Act made changes to the to the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (FFCRA), it does not extend the mandatory leave portion of the FFCRA. Therefore, as of January 1, 2021, employers will no longer be required to provide the mandatory Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) or Emergency paid FMLA leave (EFMLA) under the FFCRA.

FFCRA Paid Leave Expires on December 31, 2020

Since its creation in March 2020, employers have navigated the paid leave entitlements provided to employees through the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The FFCRA, the largest paid leave program ever implemented by the federal government, was passed in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and provided up to two weeks of emergency paid sick leave and up to ten weeks of paid emergency family and medical leave for certain COVID-19-related reasons to public sector employees and employees of private employers with fewer than 500 employees.

Can Employers Require Employees to Get a Covid-19 Vaccine? Possibly, but Legal and Policy Questions Remain

In November 2020, the world received some long-awaited good news in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic. Three of the groups working furiously to produce vaccines announced very promising results in their initial trials. The three groups have announced that their vaccines have produced an immune system response ranging from 70 to 95% of the individuals vaccinated so far. For employers, this brought a new question to mind: “May I require my employees to be immunized against COVID-19 as a condition of employment?”

Can Employers Require Employees to Get a Covid-19 Vaccine? Possibly, but Legal and Policy Questions Remain.

In November 2020, the world received some long-awaited good news in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic. Three of the groups working furiously to produce vaccines announced very promising results in their initial trials. The three groups have announced that their vaccines have produced an immune system response ranging from 70 to 95% of the individuals vaccinated so far. For employers, this brought a new question to mind: “May I require my employees to be immunized against COVID-19 as a condition of employment?” As explained below, there are both legal and policy questions that must be answered before employers can make that decision for their own employees.

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