Former City Attorney May to Join Madison Firm Boardman Clark

Michael P. May, who retired as Madison City Attorney on June 1, will be joining Boardman Clark in October, 2020.

May served 16 years as Madison City Attorney, the second-longest tenure in the City’s history.  He joins Boardman Clark as Senior Counsel. May will provide legal services to municipal and local government clients and provide strategic guidance to the Firm in a number of areas.

“We are excited to have a lawyer of Mike May’s caliber and stature join our firm,” said Richard Heinemann, Chair of Boardman Clark’s Executive Committee. “He has a unique range of experience and expertise that will add to our Firm’s depth in several practice areas, including our municipal and litigation teams.”  

“I am extremely happy to join Boardman Clark, one of Madison’s preeminent law firms,” May said. “I love the law, and this new relationship allows me to bring my knowledge and experience to the service of the clients of Boardman Clark.”

May is a native of Madison, graduating from Holy Name Seminary High School, The UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and the UW Law School.  May worked for Boardman, Suhr, Curry & Field, the predecessor of Boardman Clark, from 1979-2004.  In 2004, he was appointed Madison City Attorney by Mayor Dave Cieslewicz, and was subsequently reappointed by Mayor Paul Soglin and Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway. 

Boardman & Clark LLP is one of Madison’s largest, longest-standing law firms. The firm currently operates with 67 attorneys and serves individuals, businesses, school districts, and local governments in a wide variety of practice areas, including municipal, litigation, banking, corporate, estate planning, family, franchise and dealership, intellectual property, labor and employment, real estate, school, and taxation.

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